Thursday, 18 September 2014

the birth of a nation through a child's eyes.

A Tale of Love and Darkness by Amos Oz (2002)

"When my father was a young man in Vilna, every wall in Europe said, 'Jews go home to Palestine.' Fifty years later, when he went back to Europe on a visit, the walls all screamed, 'Jews get out of Palestine.'"

  Amos was 9 when Israel became a nation. And 12 when his mother committed suicide. In his memoir, he tells the story of his family and how they suddenly found themselves in the Holy Land. He also gives an insight about what it was like being a child in Jerusalem under the making of Israel. But most importantly, it's about the joys and sorrows of a family.

 Beautifully written, it's both tragic and funny at the same time. I have had a hard time coming up with something clever to say about it, and that usually means that the book is great.

What I liked best about the book, is that it doesn't feel like a memoir at all. I think it's because the story isn't chronological, but jumps back and forth in time. I also learnt a lot from the book. The most eye-opening information, at least for me, was the British involvement when Israel was created. It also reminded me how much I need to read Jerusalem. Needless to say that I have definitely added more books by Amos Oz to my reading list. I'm also excited that Natalie Portman is making this book into a film. 

I read this as a part of Bjørg and Hedda's off-the-shelf challenge, this time the theme was Asia. And A Tale of Love and Darkness has been on my shelf since 2011, so about time.

2 comments:

  1. Den høres ut som den ligger i min gate.
    Velskrevet memoar, med trippelkryssverdi.
    Notert!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jepp! Bør spares til vi kommer til forfatterbiografier hos Ingalill.

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