Tuesday, 26 August 2014

Thirty-one. Not old. Not young. But a viable die-able age.

the God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy (1997)

“As Estha stirred the thick jam he thought Two Thoughts and the Two Thoughts he thought were these:
a) Anything can happen to anyone.
and
b) It is best to be prepared.” 

Rahel and Estha are twins that have returned to their childhood home. Estha hasn't been there since he was sent to his father after the terrible event of their cousin Sophie Mol's death, while Rahel stayed with her grandparents as her mother was sent away as well for loving the wrong man.

The story moves between the now at the twins' return and the then with the death of Sophie Mol as the main event with a couple of twists and turns. But what really makes this book is the beautiful prose. Sometimes a mere sentence could make me laugh out loud or just sigh. It's definitely a slow-reading book. Although it's beautifully written and I enjoyed the story, I felt that there was something missing, but I cannot put my finger on exactly what. It is also a hard book to write about. But it is definitely worth a read!

The book won the Man Booker Prize in 1997 and is also August's read in Line's 1001 books reading circle.

“And the air was full of Thoughts and Things to Say. But at times like these, only the Small Things are ever said. Big Things lurk unsaid inside.”

2 comments:

  1. Eg syns og den var vanskeleg å skrive om, men språket var nydeleg. Absolutt verdt å lese :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Det er ofte de beste bøkene som er vanskeligst å skrive om av en eller annen merkelig grunn.

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