Sunday, 23 March 2014

fourteen.

Season of Migration to the North by Tayeb Salih (1966)


"'You remind me of a dear friend with whom I was on very close terms in London - Dr Mustafa Sa'eed. He used to be my teacher. In 1928 he was President of the Society for the Struggle for African Freedom of which I was a committee member. What a man he was! He's one of the greatest Africans I've known. He had wide contacts. Heavens, that man - women fell for him like flies. He used to say "I'll liberate Africa with my penis", and he laughed so widely you could see the back of his throat.'"

When the narrator comes home to the village by a bend in the Nile, he notices a stranger amongst the crowd. The stranger is intriguing, and soon the narrator is obsessed about him. His name is Mustafa Sa'eed and he had suddenly settled down in the village and married a local girl. Right before his sudden death, Mustafa tells the narrator about his life.


He grew up around Khartoum and happened to be one of the smartest in his class, so he was sent to Cairo to continue his education. From there, he went to London, where he became very successful and popular, especially with the ladies. So popular that a couple of them committed suicide after he was finished with them. And then he killed the one he married, spent some time in jail and went back to Sudan.

It's a mix between north and south, old and new, and when you read it, you realise that there are no differences between us and them, regardless of who you or they are. It's a story about love and madness. I liked the prose and the book gave me a lot of things to think about. It's definitely a good quick read that will leave you pondering.

I chose this for an African book in Bjørg's off the shelf challenge and it's been on my shelf since 2010, so it was about time to read it. 

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