Sunday, 27 October 2013

fifty.

the Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (1985)

“I almost gasp: he's said a forbidden word. Sterile. There is no such thing as a sterile man anymore, not officially. There are only women who are fruitful and women who are barren, that's the law.”

The republic of Gilead is a strict religious society where the women are divided into groups. The Wives, dressed in blue, are on top of the chain, while the Daughters dress in white. The Econowives are married to men of lower statuses, and wear multicoloured dresses. The Handmaids dress in red and are surrogates for the infertile Wives. Then you have the Aunts in brown dresses who teach the Handmaids how to behave and the domestic servants, Marthas dressed in green.

Offred is the narrator who tells her tale while living in a house of a Commander and his wife, Serena Joy. Her daily life is a routine, and the only joy is the shopping round with an other Handmaid. But although she has been taught this new life, how can she forget her old life, when she was free, and had a man and a child? She doesn't know if they are dead or alive at this point. 

I think this is one of the most provoking books I've read. The society is so anti-women that it made me quite mad. And of course it made me feel grateful for my freedom. It is brilliantly written, but to be honest, the end really disappointed me; I wanted more answers. I never seem to get enough answers when I read dystopian novels, I'm really fascinated with the societies and histories. 

I think this is the best Atwood book I've read. And it has placed her very high up on my list of favourite authors. Read it! This was also October's read in Line's 1001 books reading challenge.

6 comments:

  1. Jeg har også satt denne høyt på min favorittliste! Skremmende aktuell og selv om vi kan være glad for friheten vi har, er det en skremmende tanke at kvinners rettigheter kan fratas så enkelt.

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  2. Enig i at boken er både provoserende og aktuell. Og Atwood er like glitrende som alltid! Elsker henne.

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    1. Gleder meg til å lese ditt superanalyktiske innlegg når du er ferdig med boka.

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  3. Har også denne boka og forfattaren høgt oppe på favorittlista mi:) Likte forøvrig at slutten var åpen, sjølv om eg vanligvis vil vite korleis det ender...

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    Replies
    1. Ja, etter et par ukers tenking så er jeg egentlig glad for det historiske perspektivet. En interessant vri.

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