Thursday, 11 April 2013

twenty-two.

the Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami (1994)

 “Between the end of that strange summer and the approach of winter, my life went on without change. Each day would dawn without incident and end as it had begun. It rained a lot in September. October had several warm, sweaty days. Aside from the weather, there was hardly anything to distinguish one day from the next. I worked at concentrating my attention on the real and useful. I would go to the pool almost every day for a long swim, take walks, make myself three meals.

But even so, every now and then I would feel a violent stab of loneliness. The very water I drank, the very air I breathed, would feel like long, sharp needles. The pages of a book in my hands would take on the threatening metallic gleam of razor blades. I could hear the roots of loneliness creeping through me when the world was hushed at four o'clock in the morning.”

 Toru Okada has left his job when the cat in the house goes missing. His wife wants him to find the cat, which leads him to meeting some new and weird acquaintances. A woman called Malta Kano calls him and says that she'd help him find the cat. May Kasahara is a 16 year old living in one of the houses next door who has been in a motorcycle accident and therefore doesn't go to school. And then there is this unknown woman who phones him and asks him about sex. From there things get more complicated. One day his wife, Kumiko, simply disappears. Toru doesn't believe that she has gone willingly, and blames his nemesis; his brother-in-law.

This is the kind of Murakami I like. Nothing too weird, amazing characters, cats, corridors and sex. I also liked that Manchuria and World War II is one of the settings, and I definitely want to read more about the subject.  Murakami has turned into one of those authors whom I need to have at least one unread book from on my bookshelves. He is also best in small doses, so one or two books a year is enough.

2 comments:

  1. Hvis jeg skal forsøke å dyppe tåen ut i Murakamis forfatterskap høres kanskje dette ut som et godt sted å begynne. Jeg har Murakami-angst. Det er noe i meg som sier meg at historiene hans er for merkelige for min smak, men det kan jeg jo ikke egentlig vite før jeg har forsøkt meg.

    Ha en fortsatt fin søndag, Monika!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jeg anbefaler å begynne med Norwegian Wood, det er fortsatt min favoritt! Denne er en god nummer to.

      Takk det samme :)

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