Saturday, 26 January 2013

eight.

Hangover Square by Patrick Hamilton (1941)

 "Then he remembered, without any difficulty, what he it was he had to do: he had to kill Netta Longdon."

Earl's Court, London, 1939. George Harvey Bone is obsessed with Netta Longdon, an obsession which sometimes is love, other times hate. Netta has starred in some minor films, but now she spends her days drinking other people's money and doing little else. And George, who is one of the silent types and a little dumb, is the perfect tool for Netta. 
George has always been a bit awkward, and he has this mood, he described it himself as dead, other use the word dumb, which occasionally comes over him. It always starts with a crack in the brain and then his mood alters to the worse and he often doesn't remember what happens when he is in this mood. In this dead mood he plans to kill Netta.

I have seldom rooted for a possible murder as I have done in this book because Hamilton has portrayed Netta as a horrible woman and George as a man to pity. The fact that she secretly found fascism, Hitler and Mussolini sexy and the way she calculated every move when it came to money and men, made me really dislike her. 

Patrick Hamilton is one of the best authors I have stumbled upon and I really wish more people would do the same. And Hangover Square is possibly his best work, but it's been a while since I read Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky so it's hard to tell. And the Slaves of Solitude was also great. I'm glad I still have the Gorse Trilogy to read. 


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