Sunday, 29 April 2012

twenty-six.


 "If animals were more like us,
if mice kept pets and toads could cuss,
if dogs had wives and chipmunks dated,
sheep sat still and meditated,
then in the forest, field and dairy
you might find this bestiary,
read by storks, by rats and kitties,
skimmed by cows with milk-stained titties.
"I found this book to be most droll,"
might quip the bear, the owl, the mole.
Others, though, would be more coarse.
"Bull," could say the pig and horse.
As to the scribe, they'd quote the hen:
"Trust me, he's no La Fontaine."

  This is a remarkable collection of short stories told by animals. They talk and swear, eat and live like humans, and most of them end up dead.

Each story is simply amazing and I have gone to bed very cheerful thanks to this book on my night stand.The stories are also beautifully illustrated by Ian Falconer and that makes this book one of my most cherished. 



I can't really pick a favourite, but I laughed a lot while reading the Grieving Owl, about an owl which lets its prey go if he can learn something new which eventually leads him to a hippo with leeches in its anus. And then it's the Vigilant Rabbit, where the rabbit goes on a killing spree while guarding the forest. 

Possible a new favourite and is definitely going to be read again! (Note to self: check out other David Sedaris books.)


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