Sunday, 26 June 2011

twenty-nine.

The Conservationist by Nadine Gordimer (1974)


A black man is found dead on Mehring's farm and none of his boys know who the man is. Because he is black, the police doesn't care and they bury the body right there because they can't take it with him.

The start of the book was easy to follow, then it all got in to a blur. Someone's thoughts are all over the book, I was guessing it was the farmer, but then at the end I was no longer sure and I can't remember the last time I read a book that made me this confused. And I don't like reading books that I do not get, but because this was a part of Ann Helen's reading circle, I didn't throw it away, although I should have.

Nadine Gordimer won the Nobel Prize in 1991 and she was brave for writing about the apartheid at the time it was going on and many of her books were banned in South Africa. The apartheid is present in this book as well as it deals with the relationship between the white farmer, his black workers and the Indian shop owner nearby. And the setting and the first part of the book are interesting, but there's no continuity in the story and it is too full of someone's bloody thoughts and memories for my liking. But at least I can cross another Nobel Prize winner off my list. I also have July's People in my bookshelf, but I won't be picking that one up in the near future.

1 comment:

  1. Jeg nekter å gi opp jeg også, men det er en krevende bok. Jeg klarer ikke å henge med, jeg forstår sjelden hva som foregår. Selv om jeg liker måten hun skildrer tanker og landskap, så kunne jeg ønske hun fokuserte mer på å lage en skikkelig historie med driv. Hun forvirrer meg.

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